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PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2017 4:59 pm 
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Baby is really just like this sorta mixture of masculinity, he's shy, but he also talks a lot when needed, he's Elvis, Han Solo, Frank Sinatra & James Stewart. John Hamm is more like if Don Draper went fucking CRAZY.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 08, 2017 3:27 am 
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maxfrost wrote:
Ugetsu Two peasant pottery makers become obsessed with the prospect of wealth in a war-torn economy--and the consequences thereof. One of the crown jewels of post-war Japanese cinema. And ghosts! With Masayuki Mori and Machiko Kyo. Directed by Kenji Mizoguchi.

Check, check, double check.


ICHI THE KILLER
Takashi Miike - Japan - 2001
RETURN VIEW
Based on a Hideo Yamamoto manga, which explains everything. Well up in the Miike canon. Best line, "I'll forgive you when you're dead." Not for the faint of heart.


TOKYO GORE POLICE
Yoshihiro Nishimura - Japan - 2008
RETURN VIEW
Nishimura co-wrote, edited, and was responsible for much of the principle make-up effects as well as directing. Not based on a manga, but it may as well have been. Also not for the faint of heart.


Massacre Gun
Yasuharu Hasebe - Japan - 1967
Black and white. Unexceptional period Nikkatsu crime movie. With Jō Shishido, probably more well known in the West for his role in Seijun Suzuki's BRANDED TO KILL of the same year in the Criterion catalog. For the faint of heart.


Note :
All of the above movies are essentially valuable as style exercises. In terms of content, none are certainly any threat to the likes of Kon Ichikawa's 1959 FIRES ON THE PLAIN, Hiroshi Teshigahara's 1962 PITFALL, Masahiro Shinoda's 1964 PALE FLOWER, Kenji Mizoguchi's 1953 UGETSU, etc. etc.


ALOIS NEBEL
Tomáš Luňák - Czech Republic / Germany - 2011
ALOIS NEBEL is a 2011 Czech animated drama film directed by Tomáš Luňák, based on the comic-book trilogy by Jaroslav Rudiš and Jaromír 99. It is set in the late 1980s in a small village in the Jeseník Mountains, close to the Polish border, and tells the story of a train dispatcher who begins to suffer from hallucinations where the present converges with the dark past of the expulsion of Germans after World War II. The black-and-white film was animated mainly through rotoscoping and stars Miroslav Krobot as the title character. The film was selected as the Czech entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 84th Academy Awards, but it did not make the final shortlist. The film was submitted and won European Film Awards for Best animated movie. ~ wikipedia
Also with Karel Freaking Roden. This is a magnificent movie with the production technique perfectly matched to the character of the narrative. Highest recommendation.
Image


THE VISIBLE COMPENDIUM
Larry Jordan - USA - 1991 - 17 min.
great title/staccato/stop motion/retro graphic fragments/electronic score/hypertext protocol collage/avant garde/good for ya noodle


GHOST ALGEBRA
Janie Geiser - USA - 2010 - 8 min.
great title/staccato/stop motion/photo mosaic/electronic score/hypertext protocol collage/avant garde/good for ya noodle


THE GUARD FROM THE UNDERGROUND*
Kiyoshi Kurosawa - JAPAN - 1992
oh well.
*probably should have been translated "The Basement Guard"


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2017 8:37 am 
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Vampyr Carl Theodor Dreyer's elegiac tale of a young man, a student of the occult, who, while wandering around Europe, comes upon a village and observes inhabitants behaving oddly and other eerie sights and sounds. Some (much?) of the film looks unintentionally silly eighty-five years after it was made, while at the same time some of the camerawork left me amazed (albeit, not a necessarily difficult thing to do).

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 11, 2017 12:56 pm 
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maxfrost wrote:
Vampyr Carl Theodor Dreyer's elegiac tale of a young man, a student of the occult, who, while wandering around Europe, comes upon a village and observes inhabitants behaving oddly and other eerie sights and sounds. Some (much?) of the film looks unintentionally silly eighty-five years after it was made, while at the same time some of the camerawork left me amazed (albeit, not a necessarily difficult thing to do).


I can't believe you forgot to include whether or not the faint of heart should be watching this one!


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 4:57 am 
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WENDY AND LUCY
Kelly Reichardt - USA - 2008
Ms. Reichardt's 4th feature. MEEK'S CUTOFF, which followed WENDY AND LUCY, was my first Reichardt film and its incisive minimalism smoked my bacon. WENDY AND LUCY is certainly a product of the same creative focus. Its contemporary
setting make the protagonist's trials harder to watch.


RIVER OF GRASS
Kelly Reichardt - USA - 1994
Ms. Reichardt's 1st feature got great press at the time. To me it viewed like 10% BLOOD SIMPLE and 90% STRANGER THAN PARADISE, both from 1984. Since I don't care for Jarmusch, this made for a listless exercise in endurance.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 9:38 am 
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Kings And Queen Less of a story and more a character study of the two main characters: Nora, mother of a precocious twelve-year-old boy and whose father has just passed away, and Ismael, Nora's unstable ex-lover musician. Emotions invoked run wide and deep, from a bitterness as brittle as pond ice on a warm day and twice as fragile, through anger, of course, and love, and a physical manifestation that amounts to slapstick. For all their faults--and because of them--some of the most human characters I've seen in film. With Emmanuelle Devos, Mathieu Amalric, and Catherine Deneuve. Directed by Arnold Desplechin.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 11:56 am 
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Nymph()maniac: Vol. 1 & Vol. 2 (2013) - While the cast goes from bad (Lebeouf is at an all-time low) to great (can't go wrong with more Gainsbourg), the story and style take a definite turn for the shit between part 1 and part 2. So much so that it's actually shocking that it was all made as one big film, rather than two separate ones. Vol. 1 is just as strange and beautiful and horrible as the previous 2 entries in his nasty little "depression trilogy", but Vol. 2 is boring and devoid of everything that made the former such an interesting watch.

Edit: I just went to the extended version of part 2 on Netflix and skipped around, because I read that Part 1 merely adds more penetrative sex, while part 2 adds a lot of conversation and a particularly shocking self-administered abortion scene. I wish I would have watched this version instead. The style is back, the shock is powerful, and the themes are improved upon. The theatrical cut is simply an editing hatchet-job.


Last edited by Rocco on Wed Jul 12, 2017 12:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 12:08 pm 
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FIRES ON THE PLAIN
Kon Ichikawa - Japan - 1959
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GATE OF HELL
Teinosuke Kinugasa - Japan - 1953
Eye popping 2011 restoration. The fabrics of the garments are worth the price of admission. Colors as rich as plum pudding. Crisp framing. Crazy-go-nuts editing. Splendid action/fight choreography. Cannes 1954 Grand Prize. Freaking YouTube.


Salt and Fire
Werner Herzog - Germany | France | Mexico | Bolivia | USA - 2016
Image
Herzog continues to redefine the boundaries of incompetence. There is nothing of worth to be found here. It takes a unique kind of detachment from reality to cast Gael García Bernal as an Italian, to make Michael Shannon look like a bad actor, and to produce a screenplay worthy of Erich von Däniken.
Variety review
... for a Real Movie which deals with some of the same issues see ALTIPLAN0


Miss Firecracker
Thomas Schlamme - USA - 1989
Holly Hunter, Mary Steenburgen, Tim Robbins, Trey Wilson, Alfre Woodard, Scott Glenn, and Kathleen Chalfant. That's it, the cast. The rest is rubbish. Should be assiduously overlooked.


THE BACKWATER
Shinji Aoyama - Japan - 2013
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Outstanding on every level. Aoyama garnered Best Director honors at the 2013 Locarno IFF. His first feature appeared in 1996, and I hope to find more of his work.


EUREKA
Shinji Aoyama - Japan - 2000
I don't get Almodovar, or Melville, or Fellini, or Godard, or Herzog, or Jarmusch; but Shinji Aoyama I get so far. Two of his movies in and I'm reading him 5 by 5. EUREKA seems a story told largely for the pleasure of telling a story. And who better to be the story than Kôji Yakusho? This movie is told in sepia @ 2.35:1 except for Kodak color in the last few of its 217 minutes. At no time did it ever seem thin or labored. Amazing business, that.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2017 9:40 pm 
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War for the Planet of the Apes: Continues its reign as franchise supreme.

err, I mean, ape- plus!


Last edited by Rocco on Sun Jul 16, 2017 10:47 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2017 12:23 pm 
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Quantum of Solace Picks up where Casino Royale leaves off and has at least as much action, but the film feels skittish and lacks the confidence of the earlier film in its story telling. principally because, I think it tries to do too much, has too many threads in the bobbin. Mathieu Amalric, as the slightly-crazed villain (as opposed to the slightly-crazed ex-lover, the slightly-crazed son, or the slightly-crazed best friend that he usually plays) appears to be having the time of his life and that man looks good in everything he wears. Directed by Marc Forster.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 15, 2017 6:27 am 
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RETRIBUTION
Kiyoshi Kurosawa - Japan - 2006
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This movie remains the most enigmatic of the KK works I have seen. Some Anglo reviewers seem to think that it is a sign of an advanced appreciation to attempt to tease cohesive (read topical) interpretations from RETRIBUTION. This attitude does not commend itself to me. The concepts brushed against in RETRIBUTION seem inherently Japanese (earthquakes and seawater are motifs) and ultimately beyond the ken of Anglos. Lack of comprehension has never stopped me from enjoying a movie, and this collaboration of KK and (wait for it) Kôji Yakusho is no exception. I hope to visit it again.


GOOD-FOR-NOTHING
Yoshishige "Kijū" Yoshida - Japan - 1960
Mr. Yoshida's first feature. My first Yoshida. I was expecting something like Nagisa Ôshima's 1960 CRUEL STORY OF YOUTH. Interestingly enough, GOOD-FOR-NOTHING had much more in common with John Cassavete's 1959 SHADOWS that it did with anything by Ôshima, and it is a very good thing. Yoshida's characters are the most naturalistic contemporary characters that I have encountered in Japanese movies. Thinking back, I may have seen a Yoshida title before, but it will certainly need revisiting. GOOD-FOR-NOTHING was a studio release, and apparently after a few of these Yoshida was ready to set his own course. This excellent interview article got me ready for viewing. The prominence of a 1958 Ford Fairlane in the opening scenes, and many subsequent scenes, was cause for a pleasant sort of conceptual fractal experience. Highly recommended as an introduction to a director that you might want to know much better. Mr. Yoshida is currently 84 years of age and joins my man Masahiro Shinoda as a surviving member of the New Wave directors who got their start with the Shōchiku studio. If you wanted to compare GOOD-FOR-NOTHING with the 1960 Truffaut/Godard joint BREATHLESS, you might join me in observing that the former's utter lack of the latter's hideous philosophical digressions would make the better work apparent.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 5:03 pm 
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War for Planet of the Apes uh....it's a really good Great Escape movie.

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Chonkyfire, spliced with rock n'roll indubitably, piper pied." - Andre 3000


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 7:33 am 
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HEROIC PURGATORY
Yoshishige Yoshida - Japan - 1970
I despise bad movie titles. It's like taking CHANSON DE ROLAND and calling it ROLAND! : THE MOVIE. This is irrelevant because HEROIC PURGATORY is not so much a bad title as an indecipherable one, which makes it a perfect match for the movie. The visuals here are drop dead bizarre as the camera often seems slaved to the nearest planar surface be it ceiling or wall, and the actors afterthoughts pinned at random on an architectural still life. Don't get me wrong, I loved the visuals; I just found no way to relate the unusual perspectives to some sort of cohesive structure which advanced the narrative. True, looking for a narrative was probably my first mistake. It's a wild ride, buckaroo.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 8:49 am 
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The Childhood of a Leader Murky costume drama about a child that acts up while his father, an American diplomat, is away attending the Versailles peace talks and his French mother is disciplining the servants. The score is too loud, the dialogue whispered, the story--something about being a metaphor for the rise of fascism after WWI--too obtuse. Great house in the French countryside, though.

Vera Drake Kind and gentle wife and mother of two adult children living in London in 1950 who, by day, cleans the homes of those better off than she is, and after work cares for the old, the infirm, the stray, and performs the occasional abortion for young women in trouble. One of Mike Leigh's best. With Imelda Staunton, Richard Graham, and Eddie Marsan.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2017 8:26 am 
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Girl On A Motorcycle
Jack Cardiff - UK | France - 1968
30 minutes in I realized I had already spent 27 more minutes on this movie than it was worth. With that world famous flaming douche bag Alain Delon as the "love interest". Will that be a paper or plastic barf bag?


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